Send your own Season’s Greetings

Illustration by Cecilia Tamburini in Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. © Helbling Languages

Illustration by Cecilia Tamburini in Little Women written by Louisa May Alcott. © Helbling Languages

When was the last time you sent a card or letter to someone? Christmas is the perfect time to sit down and connect with a friend or family member you don’t get the chance to see that often. And what better way than with a Christmas card! The first Christmas card is believed to be have been designed in England in 1843 by John Callcott Horsley, and Christmas Card Day is on December 9th.

Dedicate an hour in class or in a book club to making cards and writing letters. Your students might not think of it or might not have the time to do it in their free time and later they will feel proud and happy to have sent their handmade cards. Here are three old-fashioned but beautiful ideas to make this holiday season more special, in a literary way.

TIP: You can either buy pre-made cards to draw on or simply make your own. You will need scissors or a paper-knife and some sheets of paper which are strong enough for cards. Use watercolour, pastel, crayons, coloured pencil, coloured sheets of paper to decorate your own card. You can also design it on your computer and then print it.

Search Pinterest to get some DIY-inspiration. Here’s a post to get you started:

1 Send a literary quote card.

Choose a scene from your own or your friend’s favourite story and send a beautiful quote from it. Design it on one side of the card with interesting typography.

2 Send a literary card with a scene.

Use one of the illustrations we share here to decorate your Christmas card. If you print it in black and white, you can colour it for yourself.

Illustration by Estella Guerrera in Food for the Winter written by Rick Sampedro. © Helbling Languages

Illustration by Estella Guerrera in Food for the Winter, written by Rick Sampedro. © Helbling Languages

Here are the sources of the cards below.

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Illustration by Lorenzo Sabbatini from A Christmas Present for Barney Bunny, written by Maria Cleary. © Helbling Languages

3 Send a letter.

Many people write Christmas letters to describe the year’s main events to their friends and family. Write a short passage to describe the main events of the year.

This is also a great writing activity, and if you keep collecting them, you will see how much your students have improved over the years.

Check out these beautiful Christmas cards: A Literary Christmas: Ten Bookish Cards

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